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Pai Hui Yu

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A compilation of all known nest records and locations to identify landscape-scale parameters (distance to coast, elevation, slope, and land cover) that provide potential nesting habitat in four regions: northern Alaska, Aleutian Islands, Alaska Peninsula Mountains and Kodiak Island, and Pacific Coastal Mountains (including nearshore interior Canada). These data support the following publication: Felis J.J., Kissling M.L., Kaler R.S.A., Kenney L.A., Lawonn M.J., 2016. Identifying Kittlitz’s Murrelet nesting habitat in North America at the landscape scale. Journal of Fish and Wildlife Management 7(2):xx-xx; e1944-687X. doi: 10.3996/112015-JFWM-116
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This data table contains results for the 2014 mesocosm tests of inundation effects on decomposition. These data support the following publication: Janousek, C.N., Buffington, K.J., Guntenspergen, G.R. et al. Ecosystems (2017). doi:10.1007/s10021-017-0111-6. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10021-017-0111-6
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The USGS Western Ecological Research Center (WERC) comprises a dispersed science community collocated with DOI agencies, academic institutions, or proximal to critical ecosystems. WERC scientists conduct peer-reviewed research using innovative tools to provide natural resource managers with the knowledge to address challenges to ecosystem function and service in Pacific West landscapes. Four Scientific Themes define the research of WERC scientists: Species and Landscape Response to Human Activity Renewable energy development, urbanization, water abatement, prescribed fires, barriers to movement, and invasive species are among key factors that impact Pacific western US natural resources. To identify potential impacts...
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Decomposition of plant matter is one of the key processes affecting carbon cycling and storage in tidal wetlands. In this study, we evaluated the effects of factors related to climate change (temperature, inundation) and vegetation composition on rates of litter decay in seven tidal marsh sites along the Pacific coast. In 2014 we conducted manipulative experiments to test inundation effects on litter decay at Siletz Bay, OR and Petaluma marsh, CA. In 2015 we studied decay of litter in high and low elevation marshes at seven Pacific coast sites. These data support the following publication: Janousek, C.N., Buffington, K.J., Guntenspergen, G.R., Thorne, K.M., Dugger, B.D. and Takekawa, J.Y., 2017. Inundation, vegetation,...
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The Kittlitz’s Murrelet (Brachyramphus brevirostris) is a small, non-colonial seabird endemic to marine waters of Alaska and eastern Russia that may have experienced significant population decline in recent decades, in part because of low reproductive success and terrestrial threats. Although recent studies have shed new light on Kittlitz’s Murrelet nesting habitat in a few discrete areas, the location and extent of other possible nesting areas throughout most of its range remains unclear. This data release consists of (1) nest locations for the Kittlitz’s Murrelet (2) potential Kittlitz’s Murrelet nesting habitat. These data support the following publication (available online early): Jonathan J. Felis, Michelle...
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