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Peter Arcese

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The Exotic (EXO) and Native (NAT) biodiversity features represent exotic and native plant species communities in the Georgia Basin. These features (or rasters) were created following similar methods as Schuster & Arcese (2013), wherein they modelled and mapped bird species distributions using presence-absence data from ebird (http://ebird.org/content/ebird/about/; Sullivan et al. 2009). Plant species occurrence data were drawn from several sources (Boag 2014; Dr. E Gonzales; Dr. Joe Bennett; E-Flora BC 2013). Data for the 20 most abundant native and exotic plant species (40 species total) identified by Bennett (2014) were used to map the NAT and EXO communities, respectively (species list can be found in Appendix...
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The Exotic (EXO) and Native (NAT) biodiversity features represent exotic and native plant species communities in the Georgia Basin. These features (or rasters) were created following similar methods as Schuster & Arcese (2013), wherein they modelled and mapped bird species distributions using presence-absence data from ebird (http://ebird.org/content/ebird/about/; Sullivan et al. 2009). Plant species occurrence data were drawn from several sources (Boag 2014; Dr. E Gonzales; Dr. Joe Bennett; E-Flora BC 2013). Data for the 20 most abundant native and exotic plant species (40 species total) identified by Bennett (2014) were used to map the NAT and EXO communities, respectively (species list can be found in Appendix...
This project aimed to: a) synthesize existing regional models of invasive/native species distribution and terrestrial ecosystem mapping, forest age and climate change to deliver GIS tools to prioritize land acquisition and conservation investment throughout the Georgia Basin; and b) extend those tools to facilitate cross-boundary planning with US partners to conserve endangered forest and savannah habitats in BC, WA & OR.
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