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Person

Marinna A Martini

Electronics Engineer

Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center

Email: mmartini@usgs.gov
Office Phone: 508-457-2326
Fax: 508-457-2313
ORCID: 0000-0002-7757-5158

Location
Greengate Road Wrhse
384 Woods Hole Road
Woods Hole , MA 02543-1598
US

Supervisor: Richard P Signell
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Low-altitude (80-100 meters above ground level) digital images of Town Neck Beach in Sandwich, Massachusetts, were obtained from a camera mounted on a small unmanned aerial system (UAS; also known as a drone). Imagery was collected at close to low tide on seven days to observe changes in beach and dune morphology. The images were geolocated by using the single-frequency geographic positioning system aboard the UAS. Ground control points (GCPs) were established by using temporary targets on the ground, which were located by using a real-time kinematic global navigation satellite system (RTK-GNSS) base station and rovers. The GCPs can be used as constraints during photogrammetric processing. Transect points were collected...
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Low-altitude (80-100 meters above ground level) digital images of Town Neck Beach in Sandwich, Massachusetts, were obtained from a camera mounted on a small unmanned aerial system (UAS; also known as a drone). Imagery was collected at close to low tide on seven days to observe changes in beach and dune morphology. The images were geolocated by using the single-frequency geographic positioning system aboard the UAS. Ground control points (GCPs) were established by using temporary targets on the ground, which were located by using a real-time kinematic global navigation satellite system (RTK-GNSS) base station and rovers. The GCPs can be used as constraints during photogrammetric processing. Transect points were collected...
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Low-altitude (80-100 meters above ground level) digital images of Town Neck Beach in Sandwich, Massachusetts, were obtained from a camera mounted on a small unmanned aerial system (UAS; also known as a drone). Imagery was collected at close to low tide on seven days to observe changes in beach and dune morphology. The images were geolocated by using the single-frequency geographic positioning system aboard the UAS. Ground control points (GCPs) were established by using temporary targets on the ground, which were located by using a real-time kinematic global navigation satellite system (RTK-GNSS) base station and rovers. The GCPs can be used as constraints during photogrammetric processing. Transect points were collected...
thumbnail
Low-altitude (80-100 meters above ground level) digital images of Town Neck Beach in Sandwich, Massachusetts, were obtained from a camera mounted on a small unmanned aerial system (UAS; also known as a drone). Imagery was collected at close to low tide on seven days to observe changes in beach and dune morphology. The images were geolocated by using the single-frequency geographic positioning system aboard the UAS. Ground control points (GCPs) were established by using temporary targets on the ground, which were located by using a real-time kinematic global navigation satellite system (RTK-GNSS) base station and rovers. The GCPs can be used as constraints during photogrammetric processing. Transect points were collected...
thumbnail
Low-altitude (80-100 meters above ground level) digital images of Town Neck Beach in Sandwich, Massachusetts, were obtained with a camera mounted on a small unmanned aerial system (UAS; also known as a drone). Imagery was collected at close to low tide on seven days to observe changes in beach and dune morphology. The images were geolocated by using the single-frequency geographic positioning system aboard the UAS. Ground control points (GCPs) were established by using temporary targets on the ground, which were located by using a real-time kinematic global navigation satellite system (RTK-GNSS) base station and rovers. The GCPs can be used as constraints during photogrammetric processing. Transect points were collected...
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