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Staci Amburgey

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Amphibian populations are declining globally at unprecedented rates but statistically rigorous identification of mechanisms is lacking. Identification of reasons underlying large-scale declines is imperative to plan and implement effective conservation efforts. Most research on amphibian population decline has focused on local populations and local factors. However, the ubiquity of declines across species and landscapes suggests that causal factors at a broader scale are also important. Elucidation of the mechanisms driving population change has lagged, mainly because data have been unavailable at continental scales. We propose to address this need by assembling data to answer questions about broad-scale drivers...
Observations (reduced to detected/not detected) of 45 vertebrate species (seven mammals, seven amphibians, and 31 reptiles) across Southern California pitfall sampling projects conducted between 1995 through 2015. Habitat patch locations of every pitfall sampling project presented in a shapefile. Habitat patches were measured based on the size when pitfall sampling began within each. Sampling projects within the same geographic area may have different sized patches based on date of project sampling and if patch erosion occurred. A matrix of whether each species was expected within each habitat patch's species pool based on range maps and published records is also included. These data support the following publication:...
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Since amphibian declines were first proposed as a global phenomenon over a quarter century ago, the conservation community has made little progress in halting or reversing these trends. The early search for a “smoking gun” was replaced with the expectation that declines are caused by multiple drivers. While field observations and experiments have identified factors leading to increased local extinction risk, evidence for effects of these drivers is lacking at large spatial scales. Here, we use observations of 389 time-series of 83 species and complexes from 61 study areas across North America to test the effects of 4 of the major hypothesized drivers of declines. While we find that local amphibian populations are...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation
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Abstract Species’ distributions will respond to climate change based on the relationship between local demographic processes and climate and how this relationship varies based on range position. A rarely tested demographic prediction is that populations at the extremes of a species’ climate envelope (e.g., populations in areas with the highest mean annual temperature) will be most sensitive to local shifts in climate (i.e., warming). We tested this prediction using a dynamic species distribution model linking demographic rates to variation in temperature and precipitation for wood frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus) in North America. Using long-term monitoring data from 746 populations in 27 study areas, we determined...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation
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