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Person

Kevin D Lafferty

Research Ecologist

Western Ecological Research Center

Email: klafferty@usgs.gov
Office Phone: 805-893-8778
Fax: 805-893-8062
ORCID: 0000-0001-7583-4593

Location
Marine Science Institute, University of California
Santa Barbara , CA 93106
USA

Supervisor: Tom S Kimball
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In 30 surveys, we mapped 21,486 birds comprising 88 species “interact with” the intertidal habitat. Each full “survey” represents a unique month-year-tide combination (but not necessarily a unique day). Specifically, for each of 15 months between January 2012 and March 2013 we conducted separate, but temporally adjacent high-tide and low-tide bird surveys (30 in total) throughout the intertidal habitats. Back to back surveys within the same month are not meant to be independent measures of bird abundance and should be averaged to get an idea of bird abundance in a particular month. Birds were counted if they were in the intertidal habitat. We also counted some species, like raptors, if they were perched in adjacent...
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We collected detailed spatial data on the density and size distribution of intertidal snails as part of a broader effort to understand food webs in California estuaries. The survey area was Carpinteria Salt Marsh, California USA, which comprises 9 Ha tidal channels, 2 Ha salt flats, 17 Ha upland habitat, 6 Ha tidal pans, 52 Ha vegetated marsh, 2 Ha tidal flats. Using nearly 4,000 transects in potential snail habitat, we mapped snails throughout the estuary. Specifically, we systematically placed transects at intervals stratified within targeted habitat types: channels, pans, or marsh (or planar habitat that was mixed marsh and pan). At a quarter of the quadrats, we also estimated snail size-frequency distributions....
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Each month (except March 2012), we collected detailed data on the infection status of intertidal snails from ten fixed sites as part of a broader effort to understand food webs in California Estuaries. The study site was Carpinteria Salt Marsh Reserve, California USA, (University of California Natural Reserve System), which comprises 9 Ha tidal channels, 2 Ha salt flats, 17 Ha upland habitat, 6 Ha tidal pans, 52 Ha vegetated marsh, 2 Ha tidal flats. Each site was a fixed location in channel or flat habitat, with a diameter approximately 50 m in size, centered at the site location marker used in Kuris et al. (2008). At each site/month, we collected, measured, sexed, and dissected ~58 snails (11,643 dissections total,...
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Each month (except March 2012), we collected detailed data on the density, size distribution, and infection status of intertidal snails from ten fixed sites as part of a broader effort to understand food webs in California Estuaries. The study site was Carpinteria Salt Marsh Reserve, California USA, (University of California Natural Reserve System), which comprises 9 Ha tidal channels, 2 Ha salt flats, 17 Ha upland habitat, 6 Ha tidal pans, 52 Ha vegetated marsh, 2 Ha tidal flats. Each site was a fixed location in channel or flat habitat, with a diameter approximately 50m in size, centered at the site location marker used in Kuris et al. (2008). At each site/month, we collected, measured, sexed, and dissected ~58...
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This database is a compilation of marine mammal and seabird information collected along the Pacific coast of the United States and U.S. territories in the Pacific from surveys that were solicited among regional research communities and persons. Information from standardized surveys was gathered from 2015 to 2018 and includes programs and researchers who collected information regarding seabirds since 1960. These data support the following publication: Adams, J., Lafferty, K.D., Kelsey, E.C., and Johnston, C.A. 2019. Synopsis of Research Programs that can Provide Baseline and Monitoring Information for Offshore Energy Activities in the Pacific Region: Seabird and Marine Mammal Surveys in the Pacific Region. U.S....
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