Skip to main content

Person

Christopher G Ingersoll

thumbnail
This data release contains bioassay data from sediment toxicity tests conducted by the USGS Columbia Environmental Research Center (CERC) with 66 sediment samples collected from in and around the Upper Columbia River in the fall of 2013. Toxicity testing was conducted from fall 2013 through summer 2014 with the amphipod, Hyalella azteca, the midge Chironomus dilutus, and the mussel Lampsilis siliquoidea. Short-term toxicity endpoints (10-28 d) included survival, weight, and biomass of all test organisms. Long-term tests with amphipods (42 d) and midges (about 50 d) included reproduction endpoint. These data are intended to be used to characterize concentration-response relationships between metals concentrations...
thumbnail
These data present chemistry and toxicity results from freshwater stream sediments collected from 99 wadable stream sites across eleven states in the Midwestern U.S. as one component of a larger USGS study in the summer of 2013. This data presents a selected suite of chemistry collected at these sites (PAHs, Organochlorines, PCBs, Trace Elements, and current use pesticides) used in calculating a Probable Effect Concentration-Likely Effect Benchmark quotient mixture score for contaminants measured in sediments. The toxicity data presents results of toxicity tests following ASTM and US EPA standard methods for sediment toxicity tests with the amphipod Hyalella azteca (28-d exposure), the midge Chironomus dilutus (10-d),...
thumbnail
Description of Work Currently, a standard test method does not exist for evaluating the effects of sediment-associated toxicants on freshwater mussels. A standard guide for conducting water-only laboratory toxicity tests with freshwater mussels was approved in 2006 (ASTM 2008a) and provides a tested and validated, consensus-based methodology for conducting acute or chronic water toxicity tests with the early life stages (glochidia and juveniles) of freshwater mussels. Several recent peer-reviewed scientific publications have presented data on various toxicants (Bringolf et al. 2007a,b,c; Wang et al. 2007a,b,c) generated with this method and demonstrate consistency and reliability in inter-laboratory (round robin)...
thumbnail
Description of Work The sensitivity of listed species of fish or amphibians was evaluated in acute and chronic toxicity tests conducted with a range of inorganic or organic chemicals with different toxic modes of action. Results of these studies indicate that the acute or chronic sensitivity of rainbow trout, but not fathead minnow, frequently provided protective acute or chronic toxicity thresholds for most of the listed species evaluated. However, only a limited number of species of sculpins or darters were included in this evaluation, and not all species tested occurred in the Great Lakes watershed. The objective of the proposed study will be to: (1) provide additional chronic toxicity data for sculpins or darters...
Understanding the effects of fungicides on non-target organisms at realistic concentrations and exposure durations is vital for determining potential impacts on aquatic ecosystems. Environmental concentrations of the fungicide azoxystrobin have been reported up to 4.6µg/L in the United States and 30 µg/L in Europe. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the chronic toxicity of azoxystrobin in water-only exposures with an amphipod (Hyalella azteca; 42-d exposure), a midge (Chironomus dilutus; 50-d exposure), a cladoceran (Ceriodaphnia dubia; 7-d exposure), and a unionid mussel (Lampsilis siliquoidea; 28-d exposure) at environmentally relevant concentrations. The potential photo-enhanced toxicity of azoxystrobin...
View more...
ScienceBase brings together the best information it can find about USGS researchers and offices to show connections to publications, projects, and data. We are still working to improve this process and information is by no means complete. If you don't see everything you know is associated with you, a colleague, or your office, please be patient while we work to connect the dots. Feel free to contact sciencebase@usgs.gov.