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Larry B Barber

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Two non-native bigheaded carp species have invaded the Illinois River system and are a potential threat to the Great Lakes ecosystem. Discharges from industry, wastewater treatment plants, and urban and agricultural runoff, may be a factor contributing to the stalling of the upstream movement of the bigheaded carp population front near Illinois Waterway mile 278. In 2015, the U.S. Geological Survey collected 4 sets of water samples under a range of seasonal and hydrologic conditions from 3 locations upstream and 4 locations downstream from river mile 278 using a Lagrangian-style sampling strategy. Water samples were analyzed for over 639 constituents of which 280 were detected at least once, including many anthropogenic...
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This study focuses on providing a broad-scale assessment of composition of water chemistry in urban stormwater runoff. The stormwater runoff is a source of recharge to groundwater by Green Infrastructure (GI) practices or it may become a source of recharge to groundwater to reduce stormwater volumes to surface waters or augment groundwater supply. The chemical composition of the stormwater runoff is important to understanding the potential impacts of surface water recharge to groundwater. In this study, 21 field sites were sampled for stormwater runoff during 50 storm events from 7/28/2016 through 12/8/2017. Major elements were measured by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry and trace elements...
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This U.S. Geological Survey data release provides a comprehensive dataset of water-quality data and sampling-site characteristics collected in 1978–2018 during a study of the effects of land disposal of treated wastewater on groundwater quality in an unconsolidated sand and gravel aquifer on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Treated sewage-derived wastewater was discharged to rapid-infiltration beds at Joint Base Cape Cod for nearly 60 years before the disposal was moved to a different location in December 1995. The discharge formed a plume of contaminated groundwater that partly discharges to a glacial kettle lake about 1,600 feet from the beds and extends about 4.5 miles toward coastal saltwater bodies at Vineyard Sound....
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The Ankeny, Iowa wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) was decommissioned in November 2013 providing a unique opportunity to characterize the impacts of WWTF discharge on water quality at the surface-water/groundwater interface in a shallow, unconfined alluvial aquifer. The Ankeny WWTF discharged treated effluent for nearly forty years into Fourmile Creek, located in Ankeny, Iowa. Dataset includes site information (Table 1), analytical methods (Table 2), piezometer water level elevations (Table 3), trace and major element concentrations collected from 2011 to 2013 before the WWTF shutdown (Table 4), and trace and major element concentration collected from 2013 to 2014 after the WWTF shutdown (Table 5).
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Record amounts of precipitation fell across the Colorado Front Range from September 9 to 16, 2013, resulting in extensive flooding in the South Platte River and its major mountain tributaries. In this study, the effects of the flood on the City of Boulder, Colorado urban hydrology system were assessed using weekly time-series sampling of 3 source waters (Boulder tap water, Boulder wastewater treatment facility effluent, and Boulder Creek water) conducted from September 20 to October 16, 2012 (n=5) and August 13 to September 30, 2013 (n=8). The effect of the flood on the South Platte River was assessed using a single basin-wide sampling of 5 main stem and 7 tributary sites from September 18 to 22, 2013. Filtered...
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