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JoAnn M Holloway

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The Muddy Creek watershed, part of the Upper Colorado River watershed, is a semi-arid catchment in a sagebrush steppe ecosystem. A synoptic watershed assessment was conducted in 2010 to identify areas within the watershed that are more susceptible to mobilization of trace elements that occur in soils forming on marine shale. Samples of soil, stream sediment, and water were collected and assayed for major elements and a suite of trace elements. Formation waters discharged from two wells within the watershed were sampled in 2011 to evaluate their potential contribution of organic carbon, nitrogen (N) species, and trace elements to surface waters. In FY2012, analyses of the soil, rock, and water samples collected...
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Data in this data release were obtained for water samples collected under Yellowstone National Park Research Permit YELL-05194 in 2017 through the Integrated Yellowstone Studies Project funded by the Mineral Resources Program. Isotope-spiked incubations were carried out to determine methylation and demethylation potential for Frying Pan spring, Crystal Sister East, Crystal Sister West, and Turbulent Pool, which were selected based on existing data on total mercury and methylmercury concentrations (see companion data release (https://doi.org/10.5066/P9IUY03O). The data represent the experimental conditions of incubation experiments (temperature, time, and experimental spikes) and concentration data associated with...
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This is a geochemical data set from the reanalysis of 44 rock samples collected between 1966 and 1970, and 107 sediment samples collected in 1966 and 1967. These samples were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey for a study investigating the mineral resources of the Idaho Primitive Area (Cater et al., 1973). The samples are from the Lower Middle Fork of the Salmon River, including the tributaries of Big Creek, Camas Creek, Brush Creek, Wilson Creek, Waterfall Creek, Ship Island Creek, Reese Creek, Stoddard Creek, and Papoose Creek. The overall objective of this study is to characterize the regional impact of legacy mining for the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness Area. Mary P. Rossillon (1981) explored...
Categories: Data; Tags: Annie Creek, Atomic absorption analysis, Atomic emission spectroscopy, Beaver Creek, Big Creek, All tags...
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There are over 10,000 hydrothermal features in Yellowstone National Park (YNP), where waters have pH values ranging from about 1 to 10 and surface temperatures up to 95 °C. Active geothermal areas in YNP provide insight into a variety of processes occurring at depth, such as water-rock and oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions, the formation of alteration minerals, and microbial (thermophile) metabolism in extreme environments. Investigations into the water chemistry of YNP hot springs, geysers, fumaroles, mud pots, streams, and rivers have been conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and other earth-science organizations and academic institutions since 1888 (Gooch and Whitfield, 1888). More recently, USGS...
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This data release includes sampling location data; field-collected stream attribute data; laboratory-analyzed chemistry concentrations (total mercury, methyl mercury) and isotopic composition (total mercury, carbon, and nitrogen) for stream biota (seston, periphyton, benthic insects, emerging adult insects, riparian spiders, and fish); density, body length, and taxonomic information for benthic insects; and density, biomass, and taxonomic information for emerging adult aquatic insects for biota sampled from stream reaches up and downstream of an historical mercury mine site. Sampling took place during summer low-flow conditions in 2015 and 2016. Stream reaches were located on USFS land near the Cinnabar Mine Site...
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