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David C Heimann

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The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the city of Harrisonville, Missouri, assessed flooding of Muddy Creek resulting from varying precipitation magnitudes and durations, antecedent soil moisture conditions, and channel conditions. The precipitation scenarios were used to develop a library of flood-inundation maps that included a 3.8-mile reach of Muddy Creek and tributaries within and adjacent to the city. Hydrologic and hydraulic models of the upper Muddy Creek Basin were used to assess streamflow magnitudes associated with simulated precipitation amounts and the resulting flood-inundation conditions. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Hydrologic Engineering Center-Hydrologic Modeling System (HEC–HMS;...
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As the urban landscape and municipal infrastructure in U.S. cities changes in response to socio-economic conditions, so does the manner in which water cycles through these cities. The modulation of hydrologic processes (e.g., runoff, infiltration, evapotranspiration) by land use and land cover has implications for resilience, sustainability, and optimizing municipal service functions. The U.S. Geological Survey and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, collaborated to address the question of how Legacy (standard) and recent (Urban Greening Program or "Green") vacant lots – each the product of a certain approach to the widespread practice of demolition – differ in terms of how...
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Digital flood-inundation maps for a 4.46-mile reach of the Blue River near Kansas City, Missouri, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the City of Kansas City, Missouri. The flood-inundation maps, accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Program website at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/ , depict estimates of the spatial extent and depth of flooding corresponding to select-water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage 06893195 Blue River at Red Bridge Road, Kansas City, Missouri reference streamgage. Near-real-time stage data from the streamgage may be obtained from the USGS National Water Information System database at https://doi.org/10.5066/F7P55KJN. Flood...
Digital flood-inundation maps for a 6.7-mile reach of Joachim Creek within and near the City of De Soto, Missouri, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the City of De Soto, Missouri. The flood-inundation maps depict estimates of the spatial extent, depth, and velocity corresponding to select flood events. Flood elevations were computed for Joachim Creek by means of a two-dimensional, finite-volume numerical model for river hydraulics. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using global positioning system measurements of water-surface elevations of high-water marks from the April 18, 2013 flood and the maximum measured discharge at the USGS streamgage Joachim Creek at De Soto, Missouri...
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The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the city of Grandview, Missouri, assessed flooding of the Little Blue River at Grandview resulting from varying precipitation magnitudes and durations, and expected land cover changes. The precipitation scenarios were used to develop a library of flood-inundation maps that included a 3.5-mile reach of the Little Blue River and tributaries within and adjacent to the city. A hydrologic model of the upper Little Blue River Basin, and hydraulic model of a selected study reach of the Little Blue River and tributaries were constructed to assess streamflow magnitudes associated with simulated precipitation amounts and the resulting flood-inundation conditions. The...
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