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Lauren E Hay

Abstract (from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1752-1688.12304/abstract): The hydrologic response to statistically downscaled general circulation model simulations of daily surface climate and land cover through 2099 was assessed for the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin located in the southeastern United States. Projections of climate, urbanization, vegetation, and surface-depression storage capacity were used as inputs to the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System to simulate projected impacts on hydrologic response. Surface runoff substantially increased when land cover change was applied. However, once the surface depression storage was added to mitigate the land cover change and increases...
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The Southeastern U.S. spans broad ranges of physiographic settings and contains a wide variety of aquatic systems that provide habitat for hundreds of endemic aquatic species that pose interesting challenges and opportunities for managers of aquatic resources, particularly in the face of climate change. For example, the Southeast contains the southernmost populations of the eastern brook trout and other cold-water dependent species. Climate change is predicted to increase temperatures in the South and is likely to have a substantial effect on extant populations of cold-water biota. Thus, aquatic managers are tasked with developing strategies for preserving cold-water dependent biota, such as eastern brook trout,...
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The hydrologic response units (HRUs) available here were used in the Precipitation Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) of southern Guam documented by Rosa and Hay (2017). A Geographic Information System (GIS) file for the HRUs is provided as a shapefile with attributes ParentHRU, Region, and RegionHRU identifying the numbering convention used in the PRMS_2016 southern Guam model parameter files and Rosa and Hay (2017) report. Hydrologic response units (HRUs) were delineating using the processing steps outlined in Viger and Leavesley (2007) and a 5-meter digital elevation model (DEM) derived by Johnson (2012) using the Joint Airborne LIDAR Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise topobathy data (National Oceanic and Atmospheric...
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The southeastern United States was modeled to produce 59 simulations of historical and potential future streamflow using the Precipitation Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) as part of the study documented in LaFontaine and others (2019). One simulation used historical observations of climate, 13 used historical climate simulations using statistically downscaled general circulation model (GCM) output from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5), and 45 used potential future climate simulations using statistically downscaled CMIP5 GCMs for four representative concentration pathways. Historical simulations with observations are for the period 1952-2010, historical simulations with the GCMs are for the period...
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There has been increasing attention placed on the need for water availability information at ungauged locations, particularly related to balancing human and ecological needs for water. Critical to assessing water availability is the necessity for daily streamflow time series; however, most of the rivers in the United States are ungauged. This proposal leverages over $1M currently allocated to the USGS National Water Census Program towards developing an integrated modeling approach to estimate daily streamflow at ungauged locations, with the ultimate goal of providing daily streamflow estimates at 160,000 ungauged catchments across the United States. By assembling a diverse and prolific group of international scientists,...
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