Skip to main content

Person

Colin A Penn

Hydrologist

Colorado Water Science Center

Email: cpenn@usgs.gov
Office Phone: 303-236-6952
Fax: 303-236-4912
ORCID: 0000-0002-5195-2744

Location
Box 25046
Denver Federal Center
Denver , CO 80225-0046
US

Supervisor: Robert H Flynn
thumbnail
This data release includes simulation output from SnowModel (Liston and Elder, 2006), a well-validated process-based snow modeling system, and supporting snow, meteorological, and streamflow observations from the water years 2011 through 2015 (October 1, 2010, through September 30, 2015) across a 3,600 square kilometer model domain in the north-central Colorado Rocky Mountains. For each water year, SnowModel simulations were completed for a (1) baseline simulation, (2) bark-beetle disturbance condition simulation, (3) 2016 - 2035 future climate condition simulation (S1), and (4) 2046 - 2065 future climate condition simulation (S2). Sexstone and others (2018) provide details and summarize findings from each of the...
thumbnail
The U.S. Geological Survey Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) was used to assess the effects of changing climate and land disturbance on seasonal streamflow in the Rio Grande Headwaters (RGHW) region. Three applications of PRMS in the RGHW were used to simulate 1) baseline effects of climate, 2) effects of bark-beetle induced tree mortality, and 3) effects of wildfire, on components of the hydrologic cycle and subsequent seasonal streamflow runoff from April through September for water years 1980 through 2017. PRMS input files and select PRMS output variables for each simulation are contained in this data release to accompany the journal article.
thumbnail
The U.S. Geological Survey Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) was used to assess the effects of changing climate and land disturbance on seasonal streamflow in the Rio Grande Headwaters (RGHW) region. Three applications of PRMS in the RGHW were used to simulate 1) baseline effects of climate (see RGHW-PRMS_baseline_input.zip), 2) effects of bark-beetle induced tree mortality (see RGHW-PRMS_BB_input.zip), and 3) effects of wildfire (see RGHW-PRMS_fire_input.zip), on components of the hydrologic cycle by hydrologic response unit (HRU) and subsequent seasonal streamflow runoff from April through September for water years 1980 through 2017. PRMS input files (control, climate-by-hru, data, parameter, dynamic...
This webinar is part of a series featuring South Central Climate Science Center researchers studying the Rio Grande, a critical water resource for people and wildlife. Learn more at southcentralclimate.org and view the other webinars in this series here.
thumbnail
Optimal hydrograph separation (OHS) is a two-component, hydrograph separation method that uses a two-parameter, recursive digital filter (RDF) constrained via chemical mass balance to estimate the base flow contribution to a stream or river (Rimmer and Hartman, 2014; Raffensperger et al., 2017). A recursive digital filter distinguishes between high-frequency and low-frequency discharge data within a hydrograph, where high-frequency data corresponds to quick flow or storms and low-frequency data corresponds to base flow. The two parameters within the RDF are alpha and beta, both are unitless. Alpha is defined as the recession constant and typically found through recession analysis. For the purposes of this data release...
View more...
ScienceBase brings together the best information it can find about USGS researchers and offices to show connections to publications, projects, and data. We are still working to improve this process and information is by no means complete. If you don't see everything you know is associated with you, a colleague, or your office, please be patient while we work to connect the dots. Feel free to contact sciencebase@usgs.gov.