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Organization

BLM Wyoming - Rock Springs Field Office

BLM Wyoming - Rock Springs Field Office
Rock Springs Field Office manages 3.6 million acres of public land surface, 3.5 million acres of public subsurface minerals in southwestern Wyoming, and administers programs related to: minerals, wildlife, recreation, wild horses, livestock, and trails.
http://www.blm.gov/wy/st/en/field_offices/Rock_Springs.html
Rock_Springs_WYMail@blm.gov

Location
280 Highway 191 North
Rock Springs , WY 82901
USA
Parent Organization: BLM Wyoming State Office
This project involves both biological and herbicide control of tamarix (salt cedar). Biological control agents (beetles) will be introduced into the tamarix stands. Chemical controls will also be used to ensure stand removal. This project controls invasive species in riparian areas to reduce economic and ecological impacts. These impacts are especially acute in riparian ecosystems. This collaborative effort with Sweetwater County leverages available resources. 2008 Update: Four hundred (400) acres of weed treatments were applied, including the tamarisk and perennial pepperweed treatment along Little Bitter Creek and Red Creek. 2009 Update: The beetles for the biological control of the tamarix in the Bitter Creek...
Use hand crews to reduce conifer competition with aspen in inaccessible areas of upper Red Creek.
There is a critical need to increase the level of control to minimize the economic and ecological impacts that invasive species cause. BLM has a commitment to Sweetwater County and private adjacent land owners for controlling weeds. Control of noxious weeds is a priority within the local county and the Bureau. Native wildlife species, including elk, mule deer, greater sage-grouse, mountain plovers, raptors, Colorado River cutthroat trout and many juniper obligates, are dependent on native vegetation for successful breeding, nesting, and food. Protection of their habitats is of primary importance. One community at risk is riparian habitat where invasive weeds are displacing native species. Weeds affect streams by...
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Construct a riparian exclosure on Gooseberry Creek for habitat protection and enhancement and to improve effectiveness of an erosion control structure. This exclosure will reduce a headcut caused by livestock and wild horses accessing the creek around an existing erosion control structure. The structure was placed to stop migration of a headcut up Gooseberry Creek that would also threaten the County road. 2008 Update: This project enhances and protects water quality in Gooseberry Creek by reducing a headcut forming around an existing erosion control structure. The exclosure (JH) encompasses about six acres and ensures the existing erosion control structure will stay intact and functional. Access to the creek for...
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This project provides for the reconstruction of an existing exclosure to improve riparian habitat along Pacific Creek north and east of Rock Springs. This project involves a 130 acre exclosure being rebuilt and improved. A portion of the existing exclosure will be modified to place fencing in a drier more stable area, reducing the need for maintenance. Riparian and wetland habitats, and water quality will be improved and the project will enhance use of the area by wildlife including white faced ibis and migratory waterfowl. Grazing management will also be improved and the project will help achieve Standards for Healthy Rangelands.
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