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Organization

Oklahoma-Texas Water Science Center

Oklahoma-Texas Water Science Center
Oklahoma - Texas Water Science Center
https://www.usgs.gov/centers/tx-water

Location
8027 Exchange Drive
Austin , TX 78754-4733
USA
Parent Organization: Office of the Rocky Mountain Regional Director
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In cooperation with the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) utilized various field and laboratory methods to determine the presence and concentration of cyanobacteria, cyanotoxins, and taste-and-odor compounds in Texas water bodies. This data release documents the results from water-quality samples collected from 41 water bodies in Texas during 2016–19. Both qualitative and quantitative field and laboratory methods were performed. Analyses included phytoplankton taxonomy, measurements of phytoplankton biomass, and concentrations of cyanotoxins, taste-and-odor compounds, and photosynthetic pigments. Water-quality samples were also collected to provide supporting data...
Tags: Benbrook Lake, Braunig Lake, Caddo Lake, Caruth Lake, Cedar Creek Reservoir, All tags...
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The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Harris‐Galveston Subsidence District, City of Houston, Fort Bend Subsidence District, and Lone Star Groundwater Conservation District has produced this dataset of groundwater‐level altitudes and groundwater‐level altitude changes in the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers in the Houston‐Galveston region, Texas. This dataset shows current‐year (2018) groundwater‐level altitudes for each aquifer, 5‐year (2013‐18) groundwater‐level changes for each aquifer, long‐term (1990‐2018 and 1977‐2018) groundwater‐level changes for the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, and long‐term (2000‐2018) groundwater‐level change for the Jasper aquifer. The groundwater‐level measurements...
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The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) worked in cooperation with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to document the August and September, 2017 Hurricane Harvey storm event in southeastern Texas and southwestern Louisiana. Hurricane Harvey was the most significant rainfall event in United States history in scope and rainfall totals since rainfall records began during the 1880s. From August 25 through September 1, 2017, some areas in southeastern Texas received more than 60 inches of rain; large areas received more than 40 inches of rain. This data release contains the flood inundation polygons, flood-depth rasters, mapped boundaries, and high-water mark (HWM) locations for the selected river basins, coastal...
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Sediment samples and samples for water-toxicity testing were collected during 2014 from several streams in San Antonio, Texas known locally as the Westside creeks (Alazán, Apache, Martínez, and San Pedro Creeks) and from the San Antonio River. Samples were collected once during base-flow and again after periods of storm-water runoff (post-storm conditions) to determine baseline sediment- and water-quality conditions. Streambed-sediment samples were analyzed for selected constituents, including trace elements and organic contaminants such as pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), brominated flame retardants, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).
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The U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Grand River Dam Authority completed a high-resolution multibeam bathymetric survey to compute a new capacity and surface-area table. The capacity and surface-area tables describe the relation between the elevation of the water surface and the volume of water that can be impounded at each given water-surface elevation. The capacity and surface area of Grand Lake O’ the Cherokees were computed from a Triangular Irregular Network (TIN) surface created in Global Mapper Version 21.0.1. The TIN surface was created from three datasets: (1) a multibeam bathymetric survey of Grand Lake O’ the Cherokees in 2019 (Hunter and others 2020), (2) a 2017 USGS bathymetric survey...
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