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Organization

Earthquake Hazards Program

Earthquake Hazards Program
http://earthquake.usgs.gov/

Location
John W Powell
12201 Sunrise Valley Drive
Reston , VA 20192-0002
USA
Parent Organization: Office of the Associate Director for Natural Hazards
This data release documents proposed updates to geologic inputs (faults) for the upcoming 2023 National Seismic Hazard Model (NSHM). This version (1.0) conveys differences between 2014 NSHM fault sources and those recently released in the earthquake geology inputs for the U.S. National Seismic Hazard Model (NSHM) 2023, version 1.0 data release by Hatem et al. (2021). A notable difference between the 2014 and 2023 datasets is that slip rates are provided at points for 2023 instead of generalized along the entire fault section length as in 2014; consequently, slip rates are not provided for fault sections in the draft 2023 dataset. Geospatial data (shapefile, kml and geojson) are provided in this data release with...
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New Zealand’s Alpine Fault (AF) ruptures quasi-periodically in large-magnitude earthquakes. Paleoseismological evidence suggests that about half of all recognized AF earthquakes terminated at the boundary between the Central and South Westland sections of the fault. There, fault geometry and the polarity of uplift change. The South Westland AF exhibits oblique-normal fault motion on a structure oriented 055/82SE that, for at least 35 km along strike, contains saponite-rich principal slip zone gouges. New hydrothermal friction experiments reveal that the saponite fault gouge is frictionally weak, exhibiting friction coefficients between =0.12 and =0.16 for a range of temperatures (T=25–210 C) and effective normal...
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The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) national seismic hazard models (NSHM) consider two kinds of earthquake sources. Specific faults are modeled where possible. Where faults cannot be identified or characterized, alternative sources can be developed from seismicity catalogs. In a paper submitted to Seismological Research Letters ("Related External Resources", below), we describe a methodology that has been developed at the USGS for making earthquake catalogs for seismic hazard analysis. In this data release we provide the catalogs for the conterminous U.S. that accompany the SRL article. A new catalog is assembled from several preexisting catalogs. Moment magnitudes and related parameters for modeling seismicity...
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The database contains uniformly processed ground motion intensity measurements (peak horizontal ground motions and 5-percent-damped pseudospectral accelerations for oscillator periods 0.1–10 s). The earthquake event set includes more than 3,800 M≥3 earthquakes in Oklahoma and Kansas from January 2009 to December 2016. Ground motion time series were collected out to 500 km. We also relocated the majority of the earthquake hypocenters using a multiple-event relocation algorithm to produce a set of near-uniformly processed hypocentral locations. Details about data processing are reported in the accompanying article. First posted - October 11, 2017 Revised - December 18, 2017, ver. 1.1
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