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Person

John C Warner

Research Oceanographer

Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center

Email: jcwarner@usgs.gov
Office Phone: 508-457-2237
Fax: 508-457-2310
ORCID: 0000-0002-3734-8903

Location
384 Woods Hole Road
Woods Hole , MA 02543-1598
US

Supervisor: Richard P Signell
The idealized test domain is utilized to study vertical tracer mixing without the presence of advection terms. The tracer starts to mix under the application of a surface stress. The model results are intended to be accessed from the THREDDS data server available through the related external resources. The model NetCDF files are stored on this trusted digital repository to ensure backup and longevity of these data.
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The numerical simulation of estuarine dynamics requires accurate prediction for the transport of tracers such as temperature and salinity. All numerical models introduce two kinds of tracer mixing: 1) by parameterizing the tracer eddy diffusivity through turbulence models leading to a source of physical mixing and 2) discretization of the tracer advection term that leads to numerical mixing. Both physical and numerical mixing vary with the choice of horizontal advection schemes, grid resolution, and time step. We utilize the Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) model to study the mixing in the model by simulating four idealized cases with three different tracer advection schemes.
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"The COAWST modeling system joins an ocean model, an atmosphere model, a wave model, and a sediment transport model for studies of coastal change. COAWST is an open-source tool that combines many sophisticated systems that each provide relative earth-system components necessary to investigate the dynamics of coastal storm impacts. Specifically, the COAWST Modeling System includes an ocean component—Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS); atmosphere component—Weather Research and Forecast Model (WRF), hydrology component- WRF_Hydro; wave components—Simulating Waves Nearshore (SWAN), WAVEWATCHIII, and InWave; a sediment component—the USGS Community Sediment Models; and a sea ice model. We began with a coupled modeling...
Transport of material in an estuary is important for water quality and hazards concern. We studied these processes in the Hudson River Estuary, located along the northeast coast of the U.S. using the COAWST numerical modeling system. A skill assessment of the COAWST model for the 3-D salinity structure of the estuary has been successfully studied in the past, and the present research extended that understanding to look at both physical and numerical mixing. The model grid extends from the south at the Battery, NY to the north in Troy, NY. The simulation is performed from March 25 to July 11, 2005 (111 days). For more information see: https://doi.org/10.5066/P95E8LAS.
Categories: Data; Types: Map Service, NetCDF OPeNDAP Service, OGC WMS Layer; Tags: CMG_Portal, Earth Science > Human Dimensions > Natural Hazards > Floods, Earth Science > Oceans > Marine Sediments >Sediment Transport, Earth Science > Oceans > Ocean Circulation > Ocean Currents, Earth Science > Oceans > Ocean Temperature > Potential Temperature, All tags...
The horizontal propagation of a 1-D tracer patch allows to verify the implementation of numerical mixing terms in the model anlong with comparing the effect of using different tracer advection schemes in the presence of a sharp front. The model results are intended to be accessed from the THREDDS data server available through the related external resources. The model NetCDF files are stored on this trusted digital repository to ensure backup and longevity of these data.
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